Education

Whether you are looking to enroll a child in a good school system, register an employee for a technical certification program or earn your Master’s Degree, you will find access to high quality educational resources in Washington County.

The graduation rate of Washington County high schools is 92%. Approximately 43.6% of the Washington County population over the age of 25 has attended college. The below infographic details the types of secondary degrees awarded within the county.

Washington County is home to six public school districts offering K-12 education, and in the area there are  five private/independent/parochial secondary schools.

School Districts
Belpre City Schools Fort Frye Local School District Frontier Local School District
Marietta City Schools Warren Local School District Wolf Creek Local School District
Area Private/Parochial Schools
St. John’s Central School St. Mary’s Catholic School Veritas Classical Academy
Wood County Christian School Parkersburg Catholic School

DISTRICT REPORT CARDS 2017-2018 SCHOOL YEAR

VOCATIONAL/TECHNICAL and VOCATIONAL TRAINING/CERTIFICATION

The Washington County Career Center (WCCC) offers technical career training to about 380 junior and senior high school students across the county. Three quarters of WCCC graduates are placed in jobs upon graduation and others pursue higher education. Program offerings include: Transportation, Construction & Industrial, Medical & Service, Information Technology, and Academics .

Additionally, WCCC offers adult training programs in a broad array of fields i.e. Computer & IT Programs, Medical Programs, and Industrial Programs. WCCC has developed customized training programs to meet the needs of area industries. Notably, WCCC has a CISCO Networking Academy, Six Sigma/Lean Manufacturing, Chemical Operator I & II, Instrumentation & Electricity, and Programmable Logic Controllers.

ASSOCIATES, BACCALAUREATE, MASTERS AND ADVANCED DEGREES

Ohio University is located 29 miles from Washington County’s western border in Athens, Ohio. Established in 1804, Ohio University is the oldest public institution of higher learning in the state of Ohio and the first in the Northwest Territory. Undergraduate enrollment is 23,788, and the campus size is 1,774 acres. It utilizes a semester-based academic calendar. Ohio University’s ranking in the 2018 edition of Best Colleges in National Universities, 151. Ohio University has been cited for academic quality and value by such publications as U.S. News and World Report, America’s 100 Best College Buys, Princeton Review’s Best Colleges, and Peterson’s Guide to Competitive Colleges. The John Templeton Foundation has also recognized Ohio University as one of the top character-building institutions in the country. OU offers a variety of degree programs for graduate students, too, through academic departments including the College of Education, the Russ College of Engineering and Technology and the College of Business.


Marietta College is a private, liberal arts college located in the heart of historic Marietta. Marietta College is one of America’s 37 “Revolutionary Colleges,” institutions with origins reaching back to the 18th century. Originally founded as the Muskingum Academy in 1797, today’s College was chartered in 1835. In 1860, Marietta became the 16th college awarded a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa, the world’s oldest and most respected honorary society. (Only 7% of the nation’s colleges and universities have earned Phi Beta Kappa distinction.)  It has a total undergraduate enrollment of 1,144, its setting is suburban, and the campus size is 90 acres. It utilizes a semester-based academic calendar. Marietta College’s ranking in the 2018 edition of Best Colleges is Regional Colleges Midwest, 8. Programs include leadership, petroleum engineering, fine arts, sciences, athletic training, education and journalism. Students have boundless opportunities for field experience, professional internships and study abroad.


Ohio Valley University is a private, Christian, liberal arts college located just across the Ohio River in Vienna, West Virginia. Ohio Valley University has a total undergraduate enrollment of 404, its setting is city, and the campus size is 250 acres. It utilizes a semester-based academic calendar. Ohio Valley University’s ranking in the 2018 edition of Best Colleges is Regional Colleges South, 40.


Washington State Community College (WSCC) is a comprehensive two-year community college accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. WSCC offers over 2,000 students more than 50 programs of study. Articulation agreements with other institutions of higher education allow for WSCC credits to transfer to four-year institutions. Programs with Franklin University,  Franklin University, Ohio University, Herzing University, Western Governors University and Cincinnati College of Mortuary Science and Rio Grande University provide opportunities for students to finish a bachelor’s degree on the Washington State campus.  WSCC’s Early College Option called College Credit Plus (CCP) allows high school students to earn college credits while still in high school.


Just across the Ohio River in Wood County, West Virginia, West Virginia University at Parkersburg enrolls approximately 2,600 annual students in credit classes and additionally serves the community with non-credit classes, seminars, workforce development training, and workshops. Academic credits earned at WVU at Parkersburg are transferable to any institution in the West Virginia higher education state system as well as other accredited institutions throughout the country. WVU Parkersburg is the only public community and technical college in West Virginia accredited to offer baccalaureate degrees. The college’s primary service area consists of seven counties in West Virginia: Jackson, Pleasants, Ritchie, Roane, Tyler, Wirt, and Wood.